Cancer: First patient injected with ‘revolutionary’ cancer-fighting virus

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Cancer: First patient injected with ‘revolutionary’ cancer-fighting virus

Li added: “Now is the time to further enhance the power of immunotherapy, and we believe Vaxinia has the potential to improve outcomes for patients

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Li added: “Now is the time to further enhance the power of immunotherapy, and we believe Vaxinia has the potential to improve outcomes for patients in their battle with cancer.”

The treatment is currently in phase one clinical trials and aims to recruit at least 100 patients with advanced solid and metastatic tumours.

As with all other clinical trials of other medications, the treatment will not be rushed and all precautions will be taken to ensure Vaxinia’s safety.

Although the treatment has proven successful in animals, the physiology of humans means some side effects may arise.

Meanwhile, there are other treatments also being trialled in the treatment of cancer.

Earlier this year a phase two clinical trial began investigating the efficacy of medicinal cannabis against aggressive brain tumours.

The phase two trial will, say professors from the University of Birmingham: “Assess whether adding Sativex to chemotherapy could extend life for thousands diagnosed with a recurrent glioblastoma, which currently has an average survival of less than 10 months.”

Set to last three years, the trial will recruit over 230 patients.

Speaking about the research, Director of Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Professor Pam Kearns said: “The treatment for glioblastomas remains extremely challenging.

“Even with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, nearly all of these brain tumours re-grow within a year, and unfortunately there are very few options for patients once this occurs.”

Professor Kearns added: “Cannabinoids have well-described effects in the brain and there has been a lot of interest in their use across different cancers for a long time now.

“Glioblastoma brain tumours have been shown to have receptors to cannabinoids on their cell surfaces, and laboratory studies on glioblastoma cells have shown these drugs may slow tumour growth.”



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