Council Tax 2022 calculator: Check how much YOUR bills are ratcheting up from April

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Council Tax 2022 calculator: Check how much YOUR bills are ratcheting up from April

Martin Lewis speaks on council tax updatesThe Council Tax increase will compound the cost of living crisis, with a National Insurance hike, dramati

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Martin Lewis speaks on council tax updates

The Council Tax increase will compound the cost of living crisis, with a National Insurance hike, dramatic rise in energy bills and cuts to real-terms benefits and pensions all hitting households. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak’s announced a £150 household rebate designed to help with soaring bills last month, but with Council Tax projected to rise by as much as 4.4 percent in some areas, this won’t go far enough for thousands of the UK’s lowest earners.

Shaun Davies of the Local Government Association warned councils face a “tough choice” of hiking bills or cutting services.

He told The Mirror: “The Government continues to rely on Council Tax raising powers to increase councils’ core spending power”

Levelling Up Secretary Michael Gove has said councils will get “£3.5bn more” than in 2021/22, but that is only achievable if they impose such tax rises.

Under current rules, Council Tax can be increased by 2.99 percent without a referendum, but this can be doubled provided the extra three percent is spent on social care. 

Authorities that did not use up all of their 2.99 percent allowances last time can carry it over to the subsequent fiscal year. 

Of 151 councils that run social care, research by The Mirror found 89 were planning rises of 2.99 percent – the maximum normally allowed this year.

And a further 39 planned to exploit unused allowances to allow increases higher than 2.99 percent. 

Six of those authorities – Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, Sandwell, Oxfordshire, Surrey and Rutland – are set to impose a hike of 4.99 percent. 

All of this could see the average Band D bill soar by more than £100 in a year. The average Band D bill in England is currently £1,898 a year — up from £1,439 in 2010/11.

Distressed woman looking at bills

Council Tax is set to rise by at least three percent from April (Image: Getty)

Shadow Levelling Up Secretary Lisa Nandy said: “It’s staggering that Rishi Sunak is hitting us with another Tory tax rise when inflation is sky high, energy bills, food prices are rising and people are already facing a Tory tax hike on national insurance.

“This is a typical Tory con trick. They’ve stripped £15billion from our communities and ordered councils to plug the gap.

“It’s like promising us a fiver then nicking a tenner.”

Around 20 million households in Council Tax Bands A-D will receive a £150 discount, with direct debit customers having it added to their account in April, yet more than half of areas in England will suffer a £50-or-higher hike in the Band D bills.

Households without a direct debit are being urged to set them up to make it easier for them to receive the rebate. 

This news comes after councils were forced to pass on years of above-inflation hikes to cope with Tory austerity.

Rishi Sunak

Rishi Sunak announced a £150 household rebate designed to help with soaring bills last month (Image: Karwai Tang/Getty)

Central Government funding for local services have been insufficient in facing the expanding pressures being faced by communities, experts have said. 

Kate Ogden, research economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, explained the significance of this tax increase.

After the Autumn Budget Ms Ogden said: “The Government has stepped up with billions in additional funding for councils to support them through the last 18 months.

“It is likely to have to find billions more for councils over the next couple of years if they are to avoid cutting back on services, even if they increase council tax by four percent a year or more.

“The coming financial year is likely to be especially tough, with the likelihood of at least some ongoing COVID-19-related pressures, and a particularly tight overall spending envelope pencilled in.

Shadow Levelling Up Secretary Lisa Nandy said: “It’s staggering that Rishi Sunak is hitting us with another Tory tax rise when inflation is sky high, energy bills, food prices are rising and people are already facing a Tory tax hike on national insurance.

“This is a typical Tory con trick. They’ve stripped £15billion from our communities and ordered councils to plug the gap.

“It’s like promising us a fiver then nicking a tenner.”

Around 20 million households in Council Tax Bands A-D will receive a £150 discount, with direct debit customers having it added to their account in April, yet more than half of areas in England will suffer a £50-or-higher hike in the Band D bills.

Households without a direct debit are being urged to set them up to make it easier for them to receive the rebate. 

This news comes after councils were forced to pass on years of above-inflation hikes to cope with Tory austerity.

Council Tax bill

The average Band D Council Tax bill in England is currently £1,898 a year (Image: Getty)

A Department for Levelling-Up, Housing and Communities spokesperson said: “We’ve given town halls the biggest cash increase in their spending power in 10 years – and those that try to hike bills excessively will face a public vote.

“We’ve also given the average working family an extra £1,000 in their pockets this year by boosting Universal Credit and we are giving rebates on council tax and energy bills to help with the cost of living.”

Enter your postcode in the calculator and select your Council Tax Band below to see your area’s projected rise from April 1 2022.

Note that figures only apply to the council system in England, not Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland, and all figures were sourced from finance reports to Cabinet/Executive and Full Council meetings.



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