Gordon Ramsay health: Chef shocked at health diagnosis – symptoms


Having multiple restaurants to his name, along with several Michelin stars too, the former Hell’s Kitchen star has seemed to have cooled his temperature in the new ITV series alongside Gino and Fred. Although he can still be heard uttering profanities the star has swapped the stress of the kitchen for travelling the world and it could be down to a warning from his doctor to “slow down”.

The 54-year-old is a keen fitness fanatic and after running up a hill in London’s Richmond Park he was diagnosed with arthritis in his knee.

Speaking to Hello! He said: “He [the doctor] told me I needed to start slowing down. It was a case of ‘imagine you’ve got 1.5million steps to run over the next 30 years… pace yourself.”

When the diagnosis came back the chef revealed how shocked he was. “I’d never heard that word in relation to me before.” Gordon added.

“You just don’t want to hear you’ve got arthritis in your knee.

“I told my mum, though, and she told me to stop being so stupid and to just get on with it. So that was nice.”

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One reason for his shocked response is down to his rigorous dedication to fitness. It is reported that Gordon trains for two hours every day and has described exercise as his “release”.

Another form of motivation for the chef was his father passing away at the age of 53 from a heart attack. Thinking about what happened to his father Gordon admitted: “I look at my kids and know I can’t leave them rudderless.

“I am slightly scared of stopping but do know I will have to slow down at some stage.”

Gordon has five children with wife Tana, one of whom – Tilly – is part of the latest Strictly Come Dancing as an amateur dancer.

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His youngest Oscar was born in 2021, making Gordon an older parent, but he insists that the older you are the more fun and laughter you have with them as you have “done this before.”

Juggling children, work and a condition such as arthritis that causes pain and inflammation in the joints, the star definitely has a plate full.

In the UK, more than 10 million people have arthritis or other, similar conditions that affect the joints according to the NHS.

The two types of the condition are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, with arthritis in the knee joint most commonly being a form of osteoarthritis.

The condition often develops in people in their mid-40s and initially affects the smooth cartilage lining of the joint. Once cartilage lining starts to roughen and thin out, the tendons and ligaments have to work harder.

This then leads to swelling and the formation of bony spurs called osteophytes. You can develop arthritis in other joints including the hands, spine and hips.

Typically osteoarthritis develops in areas of the body that have sustained past injuries. In Gordon’s case this was a past meniscus surgery.

How will arthritis affect you?
Those with osteoarthritis will probably have stiff or painful knees at times. Versus Arthritis states that it may only affect one knee or for some people it can be both.

The pain may also feel worse at the end of the day, or when you move your knee, improving with rest. You might have some stiffness in the morning, but this won’t usually last more than half an hour.

When moving your knee it may start to “creak” or “crunch” which is common for arthritis sufferers.

Swelling of the knee can be caused by two things:
Hard swelling: when the bone at the edge of the joint grows outwards, forming bony spurs.
Soft swelling: when your joint becomes inflamed and produces extra fluid, sometimes called an effusion or water on the knee.

Although there is no known cure, Versus Arthritis recommends different types of exercise that you can do for yourself that can make a difference to how the condition affects you: movement exercises, strengthening exercises and aerobic exercise.



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