Pork pie row erupts as Melton Mowbray fires back at Red Wall MPs: 'NOT involved in plot!'

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Pork pie row erupts as Melton Mowbray fires back at Red Wall MPs: 'NOT involved in plot!'

Reports emerged earlier this week of a so-called “pork pie plot” among Red Wall Tory MPs to coordinate their letters of no confidence in Boris John

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Reports emerged earlier this week of a so-called “pork pie plot” among Red Wall Tory MPs to coordinate their letters of no confidence in Boris Johnson, as he faces growing calls to resign. Around 20 MPs were believed to have met over lunch on Tuesday to work out when best to submit their formal notices to the backbench 1922 Committee.

The plot was named after Alicia Kearns, one of the alleged ringleaders and MP for Melton Mowbray, the Leicestershire town famed for its premier pork pies.

However, the town’s pie makers are wary of being associated with the political wrangling.

Matthew O’Callaghan, chairman of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie Association, told the Telegraph’s Christopher Hope this morning: “We were not involved in the gunpowder plot and we are not involved in this one either.”

So far, six Tory MPs have publicly declared no confidence in the PM.

READ MORE: Tory pork pie plotters issued brutal warning over ousting Boris

However, more are thought to have submitted letters to Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee.

A no confidence vote and leadership election can only be triggered once he receives 54 letters from MPs dissatisfied with Mr Johnson.

Yesterday (Wednesday), Downing Street’s press secretary confirmed the Prime Minister would fight any vote against him by his party.

Mr Johnson has been facing mounting pressure to resign following the “partygate” scandal.

Government guidance at the time stated people could meet “where the gathering is essential for work purposes – but workers should try to minimise all meetings and other gatherings in the workplace”.

Downing Street was also forced to publicly apologise to the Queen after it emerged that a leaving drinks had been held in Number 10 the night before Prince Philip’s funeral last year, where the Queen was made to mourn alone due to Covid restrictions.

Just before Prime Minister’s Questions yesterday, Red Wall MP Christian Wakeford defected to the Labour Party over the scandal.

Some Tory backbenchers are said to be awaiting the imminent publication of an inquiry report by Sue Gray into the alleged lockdown breaches before submitting their letters.

At PMQs, Mr Johnson repeatedly reiterated the need to wait for the findings of the inquiry.

However, speaking to Mr Johnson directly in Parliament, David Davis, the former Brexit Secretary said that though he had defended the Prime Minister’s record to constituents, it was time for him to step down.

He said: “Like many on these benches I spent many weeks defending the Prime Minister against often angry constituents. I reminded them of his success in delivering Brexit, and on the vaccine, and many other things.

“But I expect my leaders to shoulder the responsibility for the actions they take. Yesterday he did the opposite of that.

“I will remind him of a quotation, altogether too familiar to him, of Leo Amery to Neville Chamberlain [in 1940]: ‘You have sat there too long for the good you have done […] in the name of god, go.’”



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