SNP savaged on BBC QT over bid to abandon nuclear weapons 'It's absurd!'

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SNP savaged on BBC QT over bid to abandon nuclear weapons 'It's absurd!'

Ms Oswald was confronted on BBC Question Time over the SNP's bid for an independent Scotland to ditch the Trident nuclear weapons system. Mr Kisin,

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Ms Oswald was confronted on BBC Question Time over the SNP’s bid for an independent Scotland to ditch the Trident nuclear weapons system. Mr Kisin, a comedian and podcaster, was damning of the SNP’s approach and argued that the UK and Scotland needed a deterrent against dictators like Vladimir Putin and China’s Xi Jinping. 

Ms Oswald told BBC Question Time: “The the prospect of any country having weapons of mass destruction is perhaps one that we should reflect on and think again, about.

“Certainly in Scotland, there is a significant body of support for us not to have nuclear weapons both within our parliament in Scotland and in civic society, too.

“I can only see that feeling growing.”

Mr Kisin replied: “Well it is not for me decide whether the people of Scotland have a nuclear weapon, but it’s for the people of Scotland, but the idea that in a world where we have nuclear weapons, that we would try and put the toothpaste back in the tube where it’s not going to go is absolutely asinine.

“And the idea that we would stop being able to defend ourselves by having a deterrent in a world where people like Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin have nuclear weapons is completely absurd. It’s absurd.

“We have to have a deterrent otherwise, where would Vladimir Putin’s troops be today?

“The only reason they’re still in Ukraine and not in Poland is that we have nuclear weapons.

“It’s as simple as that.”

Focus on Britain’s nuclear deterrent has grown after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and Vladimir Putin’s placing of Moscow’s nuclear forces on high alert.

Russia invaded Ukraine on Thursday in what it called a special operation to demilitarise and “denazify” the country – a justification dismissed by Kyiv and the West as propaganda.

“Today the dangers that [Ukrainian President Volodymyr] Zelenskiy’s regime pose for neighbouring countries and international security, in general, have increased substantially after the authorities set up in Kyiv have embarked upon dangerous games related to plans to acquire their own nuclear weapons,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told the Conference on Disarmament in a video address.

“Ukraine still has Soviet nuclear technologies and the means of delivery of such weapons.

We cannot fail to respond to this real danger,” he said, also calling for Washington to rebase its nuclear weapons from Europe.

The head of Russia’s foreign intelligence agency said on Thursday it was wrong to speak of a new Cold War between Russia and the West because the situation was already “hot”.

“Western politicians and commentators like to call what is happening a ‘new cold war.’

“It seems that historical parallels are not entirely appropriate here,” Sergei Naryshkin said on his agency’s website.



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